NYC OpenData

Apr 18

NYC Collaboration with OpenStreetMap

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.
Reblogged from nychealth:
Noise in NYC
Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.
Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.
To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:
4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.
NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:
111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.
Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Noise in NYC

Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.

Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.

To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

Apr 08

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 
This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.
View DCP’s Population Projections.
Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 
Visit the NYC Open Data portal.
Update April 17, 2014: DCP has released revised population predictions through 2040 on the NYC Open Data portal. 

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

View DCP’s Population Projections.

Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 

Visit the NYC Open Data portal.

Update April 17, 2014: DCP has released revised population predictions through 2040 on the NYC Open Data portal

Apr 01

image

Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 

In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”

image

In addition to using NYC OpenData in his own work (see more visualizations on his blog, I Quant NY), Ben employs public data from the NYC OpenData portal in his statistics classes at Pratt. Bringing open data into the classroom allows his students to explore their city and analyze information that’s relevant to their interests as urban planners, whether transportation, health inspection, education or other data. 

Check out Ben’s work on Citywide recycling patterns here.

Check out Ben’s work on Street Suffixes here. 

View more open data on the NYC OpenData Portal. 

Mar 31

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

Mar 14

Independently designed and launched by Microsoft Research’s Future Social Experiences Labs’ Kati London, HereHere playfully integrates NYC Open Data offering a new perspective on NYC 311 Service Request data. HereHere aggregates non-emergency 311 requests received by phone, web, text and mobile app, into neighborhoods and departs from purely data-based visualizations by assigning a human-reaction to the top service requests. Users can click on a neighborhood to see the current status based on recent complaints as well as the top complaint from the prior year.
For example, the High Bridge neighborhood summed up recent 311 requests saying, “I feel frustrated. Ack! It’s been a while since this has come up, a few reports of wildlife sightings and a few dog off leash reports. More than I’ve seen of this in a while, and a few concerns about a restaurant.”
Each neighborhood also has a Twitter feed and a daily email summary for those who would like the information delivered. Next, Kati and her team plan to add a location-finder, so users can identify which of the 42 neighborhoods they belong to by zip code.
Follow a neighborhood by email or Twitter via the links below:
Bronx
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/central-bronx
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bronx-park-fordham
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/high-bridge
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/hunts-point-mott-haven
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/kingsbridge-riverdale
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northeast-bronx
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southeast-bronx
 Brooklyn
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bedstuy-crown-heights
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bay-ridge-bensonhurst
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/borough-park
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/canarsie
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/gravesend-sheepshead-bay
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northwest-brooklyn
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/flatbush
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/east-new-york
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/greenpoint
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/sunset-park
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/williamsburg
Manhattan
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/morningside-heights
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/chelsea
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/east-harlem
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/murray-hill
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/greenwich-village
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/financial-district
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/lower-east-side
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/upper-east-side
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/upper-west-side
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/washington-heights
Queens
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northeast-queens
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/flushing
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/fresh-meadows
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/jamaica
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/lic-astoria
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/forest-hills-ridgewood
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/rockaways
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southeast-queens
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southwest-queens
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/west-queens
Staten Island
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/elm-park-port-richmond
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/south-shore
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/stapleton-and-st-george
http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/midisland

Independently designed and launched by Microsoft Research’s Future Social Experiences Labs’ Kati London, HereHere playfully integrates NYC Open Data offering a new perspective on NYC 311 Service Request data. HereHere aggregates non-emergency 311 requests received by phone, web, text and mobile app, into neighborhoods and departs from purely data-based visualizations by assigning a human-reaction to the top service requests. Users can click on a neighborhood to see the current status based on recent complaints as well as the top complaint from the prior year.

For example, the High Bridge neighborhood summed up recent 311 requests saying, “I feel frustrated. Ack! It’s been a while since this has come up, a few reports of wildlife sightings and a few dog off leash reports. More than I’ve seen of this in a while, and a few concerns about a restaurant.

Each neighborhood also has a Twitter feed and a daily email summary for those who would like the information delivered. Next, Kati and her team plan to add a location-finder, so users can identify which of the 42 neighborhoods they belong to by zip code.

Follow a neighborhood by email or Twitter via the links below:

Bronx

  1. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/central-bronx
  2. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bronx-park-fordham
  3. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/high-bridge
  4. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/hunts-point-mott-haven
  5. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/kingsbridge-riverdale
  6. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northeast-bronx
  7. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southeast-bronx

 Brooklyn

  1. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bedstuy-crown-heights
  2. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/bay-ridge-bensonhurst
  3. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/borough-park
  4. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/canarsie
  5. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/gravesend-sheepshead-bay
  6. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northwest-brooklyn
  7. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/flatbush
  8. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/east-new-york
  9. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/greenpoint
  10. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/sunset-park
  11. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/williamsburg

Manhattan

  1. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/morningside-heights
  2. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/chelsea
  3. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/east-harlem
  4. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/murray-hill
  5. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/greenwich-village
  6. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/financial-district
  7. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/lower-east-side
  8. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/upper-east-side
  9. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/upper-west-side
  10. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/washington-heights

Queens

  1. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/northeast-queens
  2. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/flushing
  3. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/fresh-meadows
  4. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/jamaica
  5. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/lic-astoria
  6. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/forest-hills-ridgewood
  7. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/rockaways
  8. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southeast-queens
  9. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/southwest-queens
  10. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/west-queens

Staten Island

  1. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/elm-park-port-richmond
  2. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/south-shore
  3. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/stapleton-and-st-george
  4. http://herehere.co/neighborhoods/midisland

Mar 06

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.
Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.

Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

Mar 04

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills. 
So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemani) has mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.
Thanks to BetaNYC for hosting this year’s #CodeAcross NYC civic technology hackathon and inspiring tools like this.

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills

So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.

Thanks to BetaNYC for hosting this year’s #CodeAcross NYC civic technology hackathon and inspiring tools like this.

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson. 
Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

Mar 03

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 
Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 

Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.