NYC OpenData

Jun 26

New York City is home to more than 65 different types of street trees ranging from the Alder to Zelkova. With over 600,000 street trees across the five boroughs, one might wonder where they are and which types are most common. Using NYC Open Data of street trees, a few local designers decided to find out… According to their analysis, Queens is home to a third of the city’s street trees and the Maple and Plane Tree (Sycamore) are the most common.

To learn more, check out their Interactive Visualization of NYC Street Trees.  

Interested in NYC tree planting? Visit MillionTreesNYC

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Jun 11

New York City becomes even more beautiful when the sun begins to set. Every day, there is a moment when the sun fits perfectly between buildings, so that rays of light reflect among the skyscrapers.

Twice a year, when the sun aligns with the east-west midtown street grid it creates a phenomenon known as “Manhattanhenge.” Yet it’s possible to experience henge events during every sunset all over the city. Last year, using data from NYC Open Street Maps (OSM) and various technologies, folks at CartoDB created a map that locates every “NYChenge” that occurs in New York City every single day.

Explore NYCHenge

May 30

Exploring urban data through New York City subway maps 
Tunnel Vision NYC, a new app created by Bill Lindmeier as a thesis project at ITP / NYU, layers data from the MTA and U.S. Census Bureau on MTA subway maps. Simply point your phone at the map to see data visualizations of turnstile activity, rent prices, income and more. 
Get the Tunnel Vision NYC app Register for MTA datafeedsDownload NYC population by census tract data on NYC OpenData

Exploring urban data through New York City subway maps 

Tunnel Vision NYC, a new app created by Bill Lindmeier as a thesis project at ITP / NYU, layers data from the MTA and U.S. Census Bureau on MTA subway maps. Simply point your phone at the map to see data visualizations of turnstile activity, rent prices, income and more. 

Get the Tunnel Vision NYC app 
Register for MTA datafeeds
Download NYC population by census tract data on NYC OpenData

May 22


This data visualization by Andrew Hill displays vehicle collisions aggregated by time of day using recently released NYPD motor vehicle collision data.  
Mayor de Blasio has set the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities in New York City. We’re looking to the civic tech community to help us achieve that vision. 
Access NYPD motor vehicle collision data on the NYC OpenData portal.
Register for the annual NYC Big Apps competition.
Learn more about the Vision Zero challenge. 

This data visualization by Andrew Hill displays vehicle collisions aggregated by time of day using recently released NYPD motor vehicle collision data.  

Mayor de Blasio has set the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities in New York City. We’re looking to the civic tech community to help us achieve that vision.

May 09

Sarah Kaufman of New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation recently analyzed six months of Citi Bike subscriber data. Her results, shown on this map, illustrate a striking difference in ridership. Kaufman writes: “of the top ten stations for each gender, women preferred the Brooklyn residential neighborhoods of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, while men were overwhelmingly represented in bustling Manhattan.”  Currently 32% of Citi Bike riders are women and 68% are men. 
Read Sarah Kaufman’s post about Citi Bike and gender 
View Citi Bike data here 
View the Citi Bike challenge for NYC BigApps and affiliated data on the BigApps page of the NYC OpenData portal 

Sarah Kaufman of New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation recently analyzed six months of Citi Bike subscriber data. Her results, shown on this map, illustrate a striking difference in ridership. Kaufman writes: “of the top ten stations for each gender, women preferred the Brooklyn residential neighborhoods of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, while men were overwhelmingly represented in bustling Manhattan.”  Currently 32% of Citi Bike riders are women and 68% are men. 

Read Sarah Kaufman’s post about Citi Bike and gender 

View Citi Bike data here 

View the Citi Bike challenge for NYC BigApps and affiliated data on the BigApps page of the NYC OpenData portal 

May 07

NYC OpenData powers the annual NYC BigApps Competition. From May to September, hundreds of top developers, entrepreneurs, thought leaders, designers, makers, and marketers will convene at events across the City to address civic challenges through technology. The NYC OpenData portal is home to a number of helpful public and private datasets from nonprofits, City agencies, and other organizations, all selected to support the BigApps development process. To access these datasets, visit the NYC BigApps data catalog. To learn more about the BigApps competition, visit the official NYC BigApps website.

NYC OpenData powers the annual NYC BigApps Competition. From May to September, hundreds of top developers, entrepreneurs, thought leaders, designers, makers, and marketers will convene at events across the City to address civic challenges through technology. The NYC OpenData portal is home to a number of helpful public and private datasets from nonprofits, City agencies, and other organizations, all selected to support the BigApps development process. To access these datasets, visit the NYC BigApps data catalog. To learn more about the BigApps competition, visit the official NYC BigApps website.

May 06

Explore NYC’s 1,053,713 buildings by year of construction.
Access the data used to build this visualization via NYC OpenData.
Map built by Brandon Liu. Data via NYC OpenData (PLUTO and building footprints) and OpenStreetMap. Made using TileMill by MapBox. Inspired by Justin Palmer’s Portland map and BKLYNR’s Brooklyn map.

Explore NYC’s 1,053,713 buildings by year of construction.

Access the data used to build this visualization via NYC OpenData.

Map built by Brandon Liu. Data via NYC OpenData (PLUTO and building footprints) and OpenStreetMap. Made using TileMill by MapBox. Inspired by Justin Palmer’s Portland map and BKLYNR’s Brooklyn map.

Apr 30

Check out the latest mashup of NYC parking ticket data with parking fines by Alihan Polat/Studio M+. 
Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

Check out the latest mashup of NYC parking ticket data with parking fines by Alihan Polat/Studio M+

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

Apr 18

NYC Collaboration with OpenStreetMap

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.
Reblogged from nychealth:
Noise in NYC
Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.
Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.
To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:
4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.
NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:
111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.
Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Noise in NYC

Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.

Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.

To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.